ENEnergy was established in 2006 as a direct result of a project established in 2005 to find viable renewable energy solutions. The scope of the project was to look at all renewable energy solutions to identify the best ones. All types of renewables were evaluated: solar, wind, waves, Fischer Tropch and many more.

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About ENEnergy

Key Facts

Total CO2 emissions from energy consumption are around 30 billion tons a year. It will require 50,000 km2 per year to offset. The Sahara Desert is 9,400,000 km2 and most of it usable for suitable plants. It can be done.

ENEnergy

ENEnergy was established in 2006 as a direct result of a project established in 2005 to find viable renewable energy solutions. The scope of the project was to look at all renewable energy solutions to identify the best ones. 

The project was run by Ivar Skårset, Hans Olav Bjørnenak and Jon Birger Sivertsen (the founders of ENEnergy). They discovered that converting biomass to other forms of energy without using any type of combustion was the most promising solution. 

However, there were still a number of problems that needed to be overcome before this was truly viable.

The issues were linked to very long processing times.The effects of that are:

- large processing facilities have to be built

- huge investment are required

- cost of production increases

Any success in speeding up processing times has a multiplier effect on the economics of bioenergy.

When we started in 2006, the hydrolysis process for converting celluloses to sugars could take weeks. We started working with Scandinavian Universities specifically focusing on the single issue of processing time. By 2008 we had reduced the time requirement for that process to hours. That is now one of our core technology advantages. 

As a result of meeting this target, we also saved investment costs on several processing steps

The time used in each process is a cost reduction in itself but we also managed to cut an expensive pre-treatment step. This resulted in lower production costs, and also in a better energy balance.

From 2008 we have been working on scaling our findings up to industrial volumes, and as a consequence, we have progressed the technology further.

We are now very flexible, and have the capability to integrate new fermentation, new enzymes, mixing of end products and so on into our production process.

We have now established working relationships with a number of the world’s leading Engineering Procurement and Construction Companies (EPC’S). They have evaluated our solutions and confirmed that they can be built at industrial scale. These EPCs are all able to operate globally and we just need to establish project teams to lead the project development with them.

From 2009, we also started looking around the world to identify where the best locations to implement our solutions were, and which were the best plants for feedstock. We have co-operated with a number of research institutions and agricultural specialists all over the world and have decided that the best place to start was Australia.

Australia has the best combination of available land that is not suitable for normal agriculture, an excellent solar resource and growing conditions, a stable economic environment and access to global markets.

In summary, we can now produce liquid energy at industrial scale; we have several projects ready to start, with the industrial partners we need to do so. We now want to expand the business to a global operation with project teams for each geographical area.

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