ENEnergy was established in 2006 as a direct result of a project established in 2005 to find viable renewable energy solutions. The scope of the project was to look at all renewable energy solutions to identify the best ones. All types of renewables were evaluated: solar, wind, waves, Fischer Tropch and many more.

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ENEnergy

Volumes

Ivar Skaarset - Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Volumes

Energy comes in different shapes, but one common denominator exists: energy is delivered in huge volumes. This means that the distribution must be efficient to keep the price for the end users at a manageable level. It also means – since the energy carriers we use are mostly fossil – that the CO2-emission from energy consumption is huge.






To illustrate the size: The oil market is approx. 93 mill barrels of crude oil per day. About 60 % enters the transport sector and is distributed to an enormous number of gas stations – every day.


The number of cars worldwide today is by the trade journal World Auto estimated to be around 1,2 bill cars. They also forecast it to increase to some 2 bill cars in 2035.


Many people believe that replacing vehicles run on fossil fuels with electric cars will help reduce CO2-emissions. This is not the way to go at all. All things concerning CO2-emissions from EVs aside, the size of the transport sector and the time available to drastically reduce the CO2-emission also speak against going down such a path.


Say the number of cars in the world today emit on average 150 g CO2/km, and each car is run 10.000 km/year. This will give a CO2-emission equalling 1,5 tons/year per vehicle and a total of 1,8 bill tons CO2 per year.


The number of electric vehicles turned 1.000.000 cars in September 2015, according to the web-site EVObsession.com. Say that each of these cars replacing a fossil fuels engine car will give a reduced emission of 150 g CO2/km. This will reduce the emission from 1.800.000.000 ton CO2 per year with 1.500.000 ton to 1.798.500.000 ton CO2 per year.





This is not bad – if it was right. Never the less – let’s continue to say that an electric vehicle actually reduce CO2-emissions with the amount coming from a similar fossil fuels car.


Every of the last few years, between 70 and 80 mill cars are sold across the world. A peak was achieved in 2013 with approx 82 mill. cars sold, according to IHS Automotive, a consultancy firm.  EVObsession.com reports approx..307.000 EV’s sold in 2014 and forecasts the 2015-figure to be 430.000.


Taking World Auto’s figures of 1,8 bill cars today growing to 2 bill cars in 2035 and equally distribute them between now and 2035 indicates that some 40.000.000 new cars will hit the road every year. Say 500.000 EV’s can be produced and sold per year. Also say that the average new fossil fuel car emits 100 g instead of 150 g CO2 per km.


This will still not do the trick for reduced CO2-emission. Every year this will mean an increased CO2-emission from the new fossil fuels vehicles of 40.000.000 tons per year, offset by a modest 750.000 tons per year from EV’s.


But every electric vehicle also contributes with a portion of CO2 being emitted per year. How large depending on how large the car is, and the way electric energy production mix is in the actual part of the world. So their “help” is significantly less than 750.000 tons – probably close to zero and very likely on the negative side of zero as well.


The way to deal with CO2-emissions in the transport sector must be to deal with the fuels for the more than 99,9 % of the total amount of cars around the world that run on fossil fuels. ENEnergy has an integrated approach to this, considering several aspects at the same time: reduced CO2-emissions, maintain energy supply, use existing infrastructure:

  • Use our fast production process to get from biomass to sugar
  • From sugar it is possible to produce all kinds of fossil fuels today
    • Gasoline
    • Diesel
    • Jet fuel
    • Create large plantations on barren land, using energy canes like Arundo Donax and Sorghum to produce biomass for fuel purposes
      • Sustainable fuels produced in large scale
      • Fossil fuel is replaced, giving less CO2 emitted
      • Arundo Donax and Sorghum sequester and capture carbone 5 times their own weight in their root system, meaning ENEnergy process is CO2 -negative
      • Use excisting distribution system for fuels
        • Our products are directly replaceable with fossil products
        • No large investments in new energy supply
        • Same distribution chain as fossil fuels

Bilderesultat for arundo donax


Some key data for the first project ENEnergy will conduct:

  • 10.000 ha of barren land will be transformed into a plantation with Sorghum and ADx
    • Will give 7.500 barrels of gasoline per day
    • Net sequester and capture 5 mill ton CO2
    • Sequester and circulate 1 mill ton CO2 per year


This will be the beginning. Australia have a lot of barren land, and excellent growth conditions for energy plants on big portions of it. Also in other parts of the world such land areas exist. The numbers below give an indication of the possibilities:

  • 15 mill ha of barren land (a portion of what exists in Australia alone)
    • Will give 11 mill barrels of gasoline per day (same level as Saudi Arabia crude)
    • Net sequester and capture 7,5 bill ton CO2
    • Sequester and circulate 1,5 bill ton CO2 per year


Total CO2 emission from energy consumption lie around 30 billion tons per year. It will require 50 mill ha to offset. The Sahara Desert is 9,400 mill ha and most of it is usable for suitable plants. It can be done. 

Comments
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 01:18 AM
You might have local resources that can help, and there’s a lot more to look into in terms of reducing your usage.First, check with your electric utility about getting an energy audit.
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 01:20 AM
I live in Puerto Rico. The cost/kwh is $0.30. My average consumption from the power company is about 600 kwh/month. I currently have an electric hot water heater.
I plan to obtain a passive solar water heater ($2700.00) and a solar panel system, grid tied, which is projected to provide 4590 watts from 18 panels (255w/panel) sited in 340 sq. ft area with microinverters ($18000.00 total cost). I figure the cost/kw to be $3.92. This seems like a pretty reasonable thing to do. Would you agree?
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 01:36 AM
This audit will identify all the places heat is getting into your home and identify the most cost-effective ways to keep it out.
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 01:53 AM
The higher the r value the better.
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 01:59 AM
hi there kenny thats too high they said a 6 kw solar system cost $16,000 dollers and a 3 kw solar system cost $8,500 thats 9 kw for $24,500 vs 5 kw at $23,900 thats 4 kw more out put for only $600 spnding that kind mony you should get more kw
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 01:02 PM
What are your thoughts on stationary arrays vs. Tracking systems?
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 01:05 PM
I live in Puerto Rico. The cost/kwh is $0.30. My average consumption from the power company is about 600 kwh/month. I currently have an electric hot water heater.
I plan to obtain a passive solar water heater ($2700.00) and a solar panel system, grid tied, which is projected to provide 4590 watts from 18 panels (255w/panel) sited in 340 sq. ft area with microinverters ($18000.00 total cost). I figure the cost/kw to be $3.92. This seems like a pretty reasonable thing to do. Would you agree?
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 01:15 PM
In Texas (in 2013), installed systems are running ~$17K per 5kW system. If you want 10kW, then ~$34K, … If you live in area with local rebates, then these costs aren’t too bad. General electric rates are between $.098 – .16 per kWh. Local rebates (like Austin Energy) can be in the 30 range. When coupled with the Federal Tax credit, then I believe a 10kW system is a no-brainer. I would ever consider a low-interest loan. My current provider does not provide any incentives. I can’t get the payback less than 14 years.Most grid-tie systems do not have or use batteries because the cost becomes exorbitant.The “average” house on the US does use ~30kWh/day, but you have to remember many of these houses are very small, many don’t have central AC, etc. A 2500 sqft house in Austin will use 3 times that (~90kWh/day).
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 01:34 PM
If you had already had all the taxes you owe withheld, as is the case for many people with earned incomes, the credit would result in your getting a refund–either the full amount withheld, if that was less than the credit, or the amount of the credit, if at least that much had been withheld.I’ve heard that some tax credits that go unused can be carried into future years. Or at least that was the case some time ago.
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 01:36 PM
With this amount of usage, a solar system to cover all electrical needs would be up to $40,000!
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 01:41 PM
50 kWh per day? That’s insanity. Sounds like you need better insulation and perhaps leave the doors and windows closed.
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 01:45 PM
Put insulation around your hot water tank
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 01:51 PM
Put insulation around your hot water tank
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 02:02 PM
With this amount of usage, a solar system to cover all electrical needs would be up to $40,000!
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 02:07 PM
I noted you said the average home in the US uses 20-24 Kwh.
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 02:15 PM
But don’t despair.
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 02:26 PM
Dear Sir, Madam,My name is Ricky Espinosa, Filipino Citizen, can you me help to figure out the cost if in will put a Grid tied Solar System in the House, I’m presently consuming 300KW per month based on my present electric bill, could you provide me the estimated cost for the complete system roof mount type. Thank you and Im waiting for your reply ASAP.GOD BLESS
Ricky
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 02:34 PM
Here are some of my recommendations for others on this website trying to reduce electrical costs.
solar battery banks commented on 21-Aug-2016 02:43 PM
If you had already had all the taxes you owe withheld, as is the case for many people with earned incomes, the credit would result in your getting a refund–either the full amount withheld, if that was less than the credit, or the amount of the credit, if at least that much had been withheld.I’ve heard that some tax credits that go unused can be carried into future years. Or at least that was the case some time ago.
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